12.22.2005

Coffee to the rescue!















Post lunch hours are usually the sleepy hours...it would be so nice if the company have this "siesta" (*A nap in the early afternoon) policy...hahaha...

"Wakey, wakey...stop dreaming gal! You ain't gonna get any siesta."


So here comes Nescafe to the rescue...deng deng deng..! :P

The smell of coffee never fail to perk me up and get my brain and mind into work. I think caffeine should be branded "God's Greatest Gift to the Worker". Remember this cute mug? It sures feel extra good sipping coffee from a mug given by mom. it just gives me the "home-sweet-home" feel.

Do you have anything on your office desk that reminds you of home?

2 comments:

missery [~A Lonely Christmas~] said...

Seems u r 1 big hell of coffee lover eh ^^. Sumthg interesting for u.
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The word entered English in 1598 via Italian caffè, via Turkish kahveh, from Arabic qahwa. Its ultimate origin is uncertain, there being several legendary accounts of the origin of the drink. One possible origin is the Kaffa region in Ethiopia, where the plant originated (its native name there being bunna).

Coffee beans were first imported from Ethiopia to Yemen. One legendary account (though certainly a myth) is that of the Yemenite Sufi mystic named Shaikh ash-Shadhili. When traveling in Ethiopia he observed goats of unusual vitality and, upon trying the berries that the goats had been eating, experienced the same effect. A similar myth ascribes the discovery to an Ethiopian goatherd named Kaldi. Qahwa originally referred to a type of wine, and need not be the name of the Kaffa region.

Consumption of coffee was outlawed in Mecca in 1511 and in Cairo in 1532, but in the face of its immense popularity, the decree was later rescinded. In 1554, the first coffeehouse in Istanbul opened. Coffee was introduced in England in the 1430s by the Greek professor in Oxford Ioannis Servopoulos. Largely through the efforts of the British and Dutch East India companies, coffee became available in Europe in the 16th century, at the latest from Leonhard Rauwolf's 1583 account, with first coffeehouses opening in the mid-17th century: in Cornhill, London in 1652, in Boston in 1670, and in Paris in 1671. By 1675, there were more than 3,000 coffeehouses in England.

In England during the old days women were not allowed in coffeehouse. They even started the 1674 "Women's Petition Against Coffee" in London.

Legend has it that the first coffeehouse opened in Vienna in 1683 after the Battle of Vienna, taking its supplies from the spoils left behind by the defeated Turks. Another more credible story is that the first coffeehouses were opened in Krakow in the 16th or 17th century because of closer trade ties with the East, most notably the Turks. The first coffee plantation in the New World was established in Brazil in 1727, and this country, like most others cultivating coffee as a commercial commodity, relied heavily on slave labor from Africa for its viability. The success of coffee in 17th-century Europe was paralleled with the spread of the habit of tobacco smoking all over the continent during the course of the Thirty Years War (1618–48).

The mother plant for much of the arabica coffee in the world is kept in the Amsterdam Hortus Botanicus.
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Coffee Bean & Starbucks which 1 u prevered most? Mine would b Starbucks. But I love Coffee Bean's Malibu though...... rofl

jiawen said...

Welcome to the world of caffeine Jo... Hehe... : D
For those who don't know... a cup of aroma nescafe in the morning is a must for me to kick start every working days... Nah... I won't use the norm Nescafe provided in my company's pantry... I have my very own private Nescafe Gold Blend / Black Gold + Coffee Mate locked in my own cabinet... Nyek nyek nyek.. : P

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